Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Word and Question 9 -- with updated link

Word and Question/ The Poetry Game was started by Enbretheliel at Shredded Cheddar.
This month's game is hosted by Dauvit at Crosses and Cradles.

And here's my entry.

Word -- iconic

Question -- What do you see in the light of day?

Morning. The sun rises over the hill.
Daybreak is misty and peaceful and still.
Sunbeams appear
Gilding the trees.
How could I not be contented with these
Phrases that make dawn an iconic thing?
(Even omitting the "birds on the wing"..)
But Reason cries
"Dawn is just day!
Multiple problems are found on the way
Forward to night, when things darken again:
Foolishness, work, anger, sorrow, and pain."
Hope interjects
"But, to be sure,
After the night the sun rises once more,
Showing you gently that though you may doubt
Who you are, how things work, what life's about;
Follow your heart
Trust what you knew --
Icons are windows to what's truly true."



Note: I seem to be ahead of the game (instead of behind like the last time) and there's no new post to link this to. I will update as soon as it's available.
The link for this month's entries is now working above.


3 comments:

dylan said...

I rather like this poem! And I find myself siding with Reason over Hope all too often, so the "message" of the poem is most welcome. Am especially glad to see the word "iconic" used not to describe some ephemeral celebrity, but used in a manner closer to its original meaning!

In form and shape, it reminds me of the two Catholic Victorians, Coventry Patmore and Francis Thompson. Rhymed lines of deliberately varied length. This is a far better poem than my own effort this month, quod vide.

Enbrethiliel said...

+JMJ+

Oh, it's beautiful! =D

Hooray for the dawn! . . . Although I tend to prefer the dusk. =)

Dauvit Balfour said...

I'm with E, I usually prefer the dusk, but this poem is awesome. For some reason, it didn't grab me the first time I read it. I must've been distracted, 'cause coming back a second time I wondered how I missed it.

It calls to mind Thoreau and The Moody Blues and the Canticle of Zechariah, and my own recent attempts to be up early to see the beauty of dawn.

Also, that was my question.